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Watched: documentary about Le Droit Humain

AutreMaconnerieOne of the makers of Terra Masonica informed me about a documentary about Le Droit Humain. The title of the DVD and the website are in French, but I decided to order a copy. When I got it, I noticed that the information on the box is in French, Spanish and English and the documentary proves to be available in these languages as well. Only now I see that the website is available in all these languages as well.

A minor note about this English language though. It is English that often sounds as if a French(wo)man not mastering the language is reading from a piece of paper. There are quite some interviews in the documentary and the English speaker is put over the talking interviewee. It sounds a bit silly and perhaps subtitles would have been a better idea, but I appreciate the effort of making this documentary available to a larger audience. Doubly so because I expected a documentary in French.

The documentary feels a bit one-sided. It is presented as a documentary about Le Droit Humain, but in fact it is mostly about the French approach to Freemasonry. The subtitle of the documentary is: “humaniste, laïque et mixte”, or ‘humanistic, secular and mixed’. “Laïcité” is an often returning notion within French Freemasonry at large, but the largest spread of Le Droit Humain was when Annie Besant started to found ‘theistic’ (and Theosophical) lodges. Many federations of Le Droit Humain have lodges working in different Rites than “secular” ones.

That said, the documentaries has some history of Le Droit Humain either shown by actors that are put in classical drawings, the reading of texts of Marie Deraismes and Georges Martin and through interviews.
The documentary of about an hour is divided into chapters about the subjects in the subtitle, but also subjects such as Freemasonry during WWII (not specifically about LDH) and charity.

The people who are interviewed range from members to chairmen and -women of lodges and umbrella organisations. They tell personal stories about their initiations and thoughts about Freemasonry, but there are also some ‘bigger stories’.
A good choice is the mix of people. One is quite harsh towards men-only Freemasonry, another a feminist, the next anti-clerical; but there is also a Catholic woman who chose for a “secular” lodge and a feminist who preferred a mixed gender lodge over a female only one.

The interviewees and places where was filmed are from France, but also Southern America. You also get to see some temples, sometimes empty, sometimes with Masons in full dressing, sometimes even ‘in action’.

The documentary seems to try to give an idea of Freemasonry in general and (the secular branch of) Le Droit Humain in particular. This worked out fairly well. Outsiders get a fairly good idea of the subject. Freemasons (also members of other federations of Le Droit Humain) get an insight into ‘the French branch’.

The DVD costs € 20,- plus shipping and is available from “Femmes et Images“.

Watched: Terra Masonica

TerraMasonicaIt is not like I actually planned it this way, but it came about that I watched the Terra Masonica documentary last Saturday, thus, on this years Summer Saint John, thus, on the day that 300 years ago the Grand Lodge of London (later to become the United Grand Lodge of England) was founded. That latter event was the reason for a small group of people to travel around the world and visit and film the most remarkable lodges and their members. Hence the subtitle: “around the world in 80 lodges”.

It is a two hour documentary in two parts. By the lodges that are visited a bit of a history of Freemasonry emerges. The first lodge to visit is “the lodge without a number” or “the mother lodge” of Killwinning. This lodge has the oldest proven existence, way before 1717, and the even older records have been destroyed by a fire.

Then we cross the pond to the first lodge in the USA. Then South to Brazil and to the Southernmost lodge on Tierra del Fuego. Next stop is the most northern lodge in the snow of Norway. Then France, the near East and the East.

The makers of the documentary interview members ranging from Worshipful Masters to newly initiated members. Here and there they investigate history and of course show lodge buildings, large and small, making some stunning images.

A goal seems to be to show the variety of Freemasonry today, but in my opinion some more emphasis could have been laid on that. A few times “atheistic” lodges are mentioned and women Freemasons also only in passing. It would have nice had the makers visited the headquarters of Le Droit Humain in Paris, or the headquarters of The Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry in Larkspur. Perhaps visited a women’s Grand Lodge. That could have been a way to say something about this form of Freemasonry.

That said, it is nice to see how things go in a country such as Israel or India and the makers located some remarkable buildings such as an open air temple in Brazil.

The DVD can be bought on several places and the film can be streamed as well. More information at the website.

Contributions?

What? Has it been over two years since I started this website? When I did, I had a plan to gather information about mixed gender Freemasonry and women-only variations and that around the world. I found out what organisations are active in which countries. With that job finished, there is not so much to add to the website. Of course I run into news and the like, but how often is this interesting around the globe?

So I was thinking. Would it be nice to have stories of members of mixed gender and female lodges from all over, to say a little something about how they came to join this form of Freemasonry, how you like it and perhaps some country specific things so other people can get an idea of the (little) differences between different countries and different orders?

Should you like the idea, please reply below this post so we can come into contact.

Honorable Order international

AFHR
The Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry is what remained when the American federation of Le Droit Humain split off the Supreme Council in Paris. Some lodges (6) decided to keep working under Le Droit Humain, the majority (8) formed the new order The Honorable Order of American Co-Masonry and the members of 4 other lodges spread over lodges of the two new orders.
From the viewpoint of the Honorable Order, they are the continuation of the mixed gender order that started in the USA in 1903. The headquarters of what used to be the American Federation are now the headquarters of the Honorable Order. The current American Le Droit Humain is the split-off in this scenario.
Be that as it may, since 1994 there were two branches from the same tree.

Both Le Droit Humain and the Honorable Order grew since. Le Droit Humain has some 16 lodges, the Honorable Order 29. What is perhaps a little ironic, the Honorable Order is nowdays an international order again with lodges in Argentinia and Chile (one each) and two in Brazil.

It is good to (virtually) run into people, since the website of the Honorable Order does not seem to say anything about the foreign lodges, but now I was able to make the respective country-pages more complete.

Universal Masonic Union of the Modern Rite

I just heard of a mixed order active in the USA of which I had not yet heard. They are active in other countries as well. I had listed the group in my page on Equador with another name (more obviously mixed). I have added the below to the respective pages.

UMURM
Unión Masónica Universal del Rito Moderno (or Universal Masonic Union of the Modern Rite) was founded in Barcelona in 2008. The Union is active in Brazil, Colombia, Equador, Cuba and the USA (California and Georgia). Information on the world wide web does not say as much, but I was asured that the Union has mixed lodges.